Toyota of El Cajon Blog

New Owner Event – October 2014

Posted on: October 27, 2014

Every few months we invite all of you to come out and celebrate your new Toyotas with us! The whole family is always welcome and, this time around, we had an amazing turnout.
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ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Posted on: September 12, 2014

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

(L) Jeremy Cadwell – Toyota Service Director (R) Steve Becvar – ALS Executive Director

 

A couple of weeks ago, Toyota of El Cajon was challenged by Steve Becvar, Executive Director of the ALS Association Greater San Diego Chapter, to participate in The Ice Bucket Challenge! In addition to our staff enjoying the refreshing ice water on an exceptionally hot San Diego day, we have also made a donation to the ALS Association.


If you’d like to make a donation as well, you can do so by clicking HERE.

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Helping Teens Hit the Road Safely!

Posted on: June 13, 2013

Earning a driver’s license is a big step for your teen and for you. Its a time for new adventures and a spirit of freedom and it also a time for increased responsibility, and trust on both sides. Toyota provides families with tools to help keep their teen safe on the road. Arrive In Style is a campaign with Teen Vogue to promote safe driving among teenage girls. Toyota conducted a study, with the University of Michigan and it shows a significant correlation between parent and teen driving behaviors. Here are a few of the findings;

  • What Teens Think Their Parents Do Behind the Wheel Matters More Than What Parents Say They Do:   What teensthink  their parents do while driving has a greater impact on the teens’ behavior than what parents actually report they do.
    • If a teen thinks that his or her parent looks for something in the vehicle while driving, the teen is four times (4.1) more likely to also look for something while driving (as compared to if the teen does not think their parent does this at all).
    • If a teen’s parent reports looking for something in the vehicle while driving, the teen is two times (2.2) more likely to do the same (as compared to if the parent does not report this behavior at all).
    • If a teen thinks that his or her parent eats or drinks while driving, the teen is three times (3.4) more likely to likely to do the same (as compared to if the teen does not think their parent does this at all).
    • If a teen’s parent reports eating or drinking while driving, the teen is two times (2.2) more likely to do the same (as compared to if the parent does not report this behavior at all).
    • If a teen thinks that his or her parent deals with passenger issues while driving (interacts with passengers regarding requests, concerns and conflicts), the teen is five times (4.7) more likely to do so themselves (as compared to if the teen does not think their parent does this at all).
    • If a teen’s parent reports dealing with passenger issues while driving, the teen is two times (1.7) more likely to do the same (as compared to if the parent does not report this behavior at all).

To take a deeper look at the findings, click here. When it comes to your teen’s driving, you aren’t just a disciplinarian; you are a partner, mentor and role model. With the right information and plenty of parental involvement, you can both breathe easier when your teen takes the wheel.

Take the Pledge to be safe and have the chance to be featured in an upcoming issue of Teen Vogue! 

To join the movement and take the pledge visit the Arrive in Style site.

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